9 methods
Thiagi Group

Participants from Hell

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This is a structured sharing activity that enables us to explore techniques for handling participants who disrupt interactive training sessions. 


Different teams receive envelopes labeled with different types of disruptive participants. Participants brainstorm guidelines for handling disruptive behaviours, record the guidelines on a card, and place the card inside the envelope. 

Teams rotate the envelopes and generate guideline cards for handling other types of disruptive participants. During the evaluation round, team members review the guideline cards generated by other teams and identify the top five suggestions.

Thiagi Group

Quick-Change Artists

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In these days of constant change, adaptability and resilience are highly desirable personal qualities. This activity enables the participants to tap into their group wisdom and work on their ability to flourish under frequent changes. Participants work individually, with a partner, and in teams to prepare a list of do's and don't-s for increasing their ability to adapt to changes. Eventually, each participant selects a factor that he or she wants to apply immediately.
Thiagi Group

Both Sides

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Organizational life is full of paradoxes. It looks as if you always get contradictory advice. For example, one manager suggests that all your training should be on the Web. Another manager extols the virtues of classroom teaching. In a situation like this, it is useless to ask, “Which is better: online learning or instructor-led learning?” The answer is invariably, “It all depends.” In the complex real world, the effectiveness of any strategy depends on the context. For example, training effectiveness depends on the content, objectives, learners, technology, and facilitators. In order for you to come up with the best strategy, you must explore the advantages and disadvantages of conflicting guidelines.

That's what BOTH SIDES helps you to do.

Thiagi Group

Back to Back

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This is an energetic improv game that can be used anytime during a training session. My favourite time to use it is at the end of a session for debriefing. Participants pair up and stand back-to-back. The facilitator asks a question. The participants turn around and face each other and take turns sharing their responses.
Thiagi Group

Group Development Stage Directions

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Different teams receive envelopes labeled with the names of different stages in the development of a team. Participants brainstorm guidelines for facilitating a team at a specific stage, record the guidelines on a card, and place the card inside the appropriate envelope. Teams rotate the envelopes and generate guideline cards for other stages in the life cycle of a team. During the evaluation round, team members comparatively score the guideline cards generated by other teams.
Thiagi Group

Rapid Responses

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Here's an experiential introduction to this activity:

What is your preferred technique for learning something new?

Write your answer on a piece of paper. If you don't have a piece of paper, just say your answer out aloud.

I am now going to ask you a different question. Once again, write down your answer (or say it out aloud).

What method do you usually use to train other people?

Compare your answers to the two questions. Are they consistent with each other? If not, why is there a discrepancy between the way you like to learn and the way you train others? Should you not help others learn the same way you like to learn?

Does this inconsistency exist because you believe that training is different from learning? Don't you believe that training has to result in learning?

Does this inconsistency exist because you believe that your learning preference is unique only to you? Don't you think that other people may have unique learning preferences? How does your training accommodate these individual differences?

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