28 methods
Hyper Island

Check-in / Check-out

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Either checking-in or checking-out is a simple way for a team to open or close a process, symbolically and in a collaborative way. Checking-in/out invites each member in a group to be present, seen and heard, and to express a reflection or a feeling. Checking-in emphasizes presence, focus and group commitment; checking-out emphasizes reflection and symbolic closure.

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Martin Farrell

One breath feedback

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This is a feedback round in just one breath that excels in maintaining attention: each participants is able to speak during just one breath ... for most people that's around 20 to 25 seconds ... unless of course you've been a deep sea diver in which case you'll be able to do it for longer.

Thiagi Group

Thirty-five for Debriefing

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You might be familiar with Thirty-Five as a structured-sharing activity. Thirty-Five can also be used as an effective debriefing game.

In this version, participants reflect on an earlier experience and identify important lessons they learned. They write one of these lessons as a brief item. The winner in this activity is not the best player, but the best lesson learned.

Thiagi Group

Artful Closer

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This activity begins with reflection, proceeds through nonverbal communication, and ends in a discussion. You can use ARTFUL CLOSER to debrief participants after an experiential activity. You may also use it as the final activity at the end of a workshop. You may even use it as an opening ice-breaker by asking participants to think about common personal experiences. For example, I began a recent session on presentation skills by asking participants to process their experiences with the most inspiring speech they had ever heard.

Thiagi Group

Back to Back

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This is an energetic improv game that can be used anytime during a training session. My favourite time to use it is at the end of a session for debriefing. Participants pair up and stand back-to-back. The facilitator asks a question. The participants turn around and face each other and take turns sharing their responses.
Johan Lelie

What will you tell who about what made your day today?

At the end of a meeting, participants have to go back to their boss, organization, community or family. There they'll asked a question like "what did you do?". This prepares them to that question, informs them about what others will say - and who   maybe the source of this message and it give them as well as you feedback on the session. It also reinforces commitment.

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