Gamestorming methods

Welcome to my world

by . Last edit was about 2 months ago
30 - 60 5 - 20

Welcome to My World gives players an opportunity to better understand other players’ roles and responsibilities and how one sees others.

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Additional info

Goal

To clarify roles and responsibilities in a team

Attachments

You will be able to upload attachments once after you create the method.

Materials

  • FLipcharts
  • Markers
  • Pencils
  • Tape
  • Pictures from magazines/newspapers
  • Post-its

Instructions

Flow

1. Give all players access to flip-chart paper, markers, and sticky notes. Ask them to take 30 seconds to write one of their job responsibilities (e.g., create the company newsletter or devise a marketing strategy for Product X) on a sticky note and stick it to their shirt.

2. Have the players wander around the room and pair up with someone whose job responsibility they’re the least familiar with or that they’re curious about. If you have an odd number of players, join them to even it out.

3. In pairs, ask the players to take turns drawing their best representation of how they envision the other person’s workflow around that job duty. They can use simple circles, boxes, and arrows to make flowcharts or they can get creative, but they cannot interview the other player or ask any clarifying questions while they’re drawing. Give them 5–15 minutes to draw quietly.

4. When the time is up, give each player five minutes to share her drawing with the other person and describe what it means.

5. Then give the pairs 5–10 minutes each to clarify or agree on the realities of each other’s drawing. They should also take time to discuss where the areas of ease, friction, and interactions with others fall in the process. They can elaborate and draw on the other person’s visual at this point, or the original creator of the visual can add content as his partner shares.

6. Ask for volunteers to show their visuals to the larger group and to describe some of their insights and observations.

Note:
  • If players baulk at having to draw, tell them they’re welcome to rely only on words, but they’ll miss an opportunity to make a simple picture of someone else’s “world” at work.
  • To be maximally effective, this game has one requirement: the players should represent a range of positions or job responsibilities within an organization.

Background

Source: Gamestorming

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