Minkowski

Check-in: Speed Drawing

by .  Last edit was last month
15 - 2010 - 20 

To understand and respect each other’s differences in worldview.

Goal

This exercise makes participants aware of differences and similarities in imagery. People differ in worldviews; that is why you should make your ideas very explicit in order to make others understand and respect each other’s differences.

Participants are asked to speed draw multiple pre-conceived concepts. After, the group is asked to cluster the drawings and to name each cluster. The facilitator takes on a passive role. After, the group reflects on the clustering: what do they notice and what are the similarities and differences?  

Attachments

Materials

    Instructions

    Participants are asked to speed draw multiple pre-conceived concepts. After, the group is asked to cluster the drawings and to name each cluster. The facilitator takes on a passive role. After, the group reflects on the clustering: what do they notice and what are the similarities and differences?


    Session

    The facilitator pre-conceives 10 concepts they want participants to speed draw. The concepts can either be random (e.g. home, organization, world, us, knowledge), based on concepts that were repeatedly appointed during the sessions and/or which caused confusion (e.g. eHealth, network organization) or concepts that are matched with the session’s subject (e.g. society, social impact). 

    Start off with easy concepts and end with more difficult ones. Ask participants to speed draw the concepts one by one. After having drawn all concepts, ask subjects to cluster them. Do not steer the group in a certain direction, but rather take on a passive role. 

    Ask participants to come up with a keyword for each cluster. After, reflect on their clustering. Ask participants what stands out, where are the differences and similarities. Make them realize that everyone has their own world view. Only by explicitly visualizing your ideas, people can understand what you mean and how you view the world.  


    Important remarks

    1. Take on a passive role; do not steer the group in a certain direction and do not explain the concepts. 

     2. You can give an example by drawing an easily recognizable shape on a whiteboard to show participants that the exercise is not about the quality of their drawing. 

    3. Emphasize that they just have to draw whatever comes to mind, there is no right or wrong. 

    4. Keep a high pace. 

     

    Background

    https://minkowski.org/

    Sunni Brown  (The Doodle Revolution: Unlock the Power to Think Differently) 

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